Tag Archives: NFL

Aaron Rodgers&Tom Brady,Who’s Better

31 Oct

Aaron Rodgers and Tom Brady are the NFL’s best players,Aaron Rodgers (born December 2, 1983) is an American football quarterback for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL),Thomas Edward Patrick “Tom” Brady, Jr. (born August 3, 1977) is an American football quarterback for the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL). The Patriots and Packers QBs are lighting up the NFL ,but who do you want leading your team?
We go to the matchups:
Accuracy: Rodgers is completing over 70% of his passes, which is completely insane. It feels like he throws an incompletion once every eight games. Even his incompletions are impressive. They usually occur when no one is open and he smartly throws the ball away before the rush gets to him. Announcers LOVE incompletions like that. Troy Aikman gets more excited for incompletions like that than he does actual touchdown passes. Meanwhile, Brady is completing a mere 68% of his passes. Mortal. ADVANTAGE: RODGERS
Turnovers: Again, Rodgers wins. He has just three picks compared to Brady’s eight (half of which came against Buffalo), and more touchdown passes. ADVANTAGE: RODGERS
Throwing on the run: No one does it better than Rodgers, who can run a bootleg and throw the ball with the exact right amount of heat depending upon where the receiver is. Brady, on the hand, is much more comfortable staying in the pocket and stepping up into the rush if need be. What a loser. Try exploring the world back there for once, kid. ADVANTAGE: RODGERS
Taking sacks: Brady has the better line in front of him, hence not as many sacks this year. But it’s difficult to know if he’d take as many hits behind the Packers line. Rodgers one flaw a couple years ago was his penchant for hanging onto the ball too long. He took 50 sacks two seasons ago, which would kill an average QB. But he’s corrected that problem since then. ADVANTAGE: INCONCLUSIVE
Advertisements: Think Rodgers can pull off staring earnestly into the camera while holding a goat? Hell no. ADVANTAGE: BRADY
Distractions: Brady has two kids, a baby momma, and a Brazilian supermodel wife to deal with. Rodgers, meanwhile, has been linked to the likes of Mila Kunis and Erin Andrews, but has no wife or love child to concern himself with at this point. He does the “being a single superstar NFL QB who dates really hot chicks” way better than Tony Romo ever did. ADVANTAGE: RODGERS
Experience: Brady has won three Super Bowl and gone through even more controversial hairstyles. ADVANTAGE: BRADY
Chokiness: This is where I point out that Brady hasn’t won a playoff game since 2007, which totally makes him a chokity choke choker, even though advanced stats prove that such ideas are complete bunk. Whatever, nerdy computer nerds. BRADY HAS BEEN ROMO-FIED. ADVANTAGE: RODGERS
Overall: I think we know where this is going. Rodgers is currently playing football better than anyone else in the world right now. Time to give him his due as the best QB in all of football. RODGERS ES MAS MACHO.[Aaron Rodgers (@AaronRodgers12) on Twitter, Aaron Rodgers yellow jerseys]

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Saints&Ingram

12 Aug

Ingram to be “heavily involved”: Mark Ingram is already making an impression at Saints training camp. In fact, Jeff Duncan of the New Orleans Times-Picayune tweeted that the rookie will be very much involved in the offense right out of the gate. Ingram figures to see plenty of early-down work for coach Sean Payton, and I also think he’ll be the favorite for goal-line carries, which just adds to his draft value. While the backfield is a bit crowded with Pierre Thomas and Darren Sproles in the mix, Ingram still has middle-round value as a No. 2 or 3 fantasy runner. He will no doubt be the first player taken in many dynasty leagues.
Edwards signs with the Niners: Braylon Edwards hasn’t exactly been a reliable fantasy wide receiver and, in fact, has been mediocre at best outside of his breakout season of 2007. Edwards isn’t likely to re-gain his once elite status with the 49ers – he’ll be more of a No. 4 fantasy option in most formats. But what does his signing mean for Michael Crabtree? Crabtree will miss his third straight preseason with a foot injury, and it’s hard not to think the addition of Edwards could be tied to that situation. Despite his potential, it’s tough to take a chance on Crabtree as anything more than a late-round, risk-reward selection.
McFadden to miss two weeks: Vittorio Tafur of the San Francisco Chronicle reported that Darren McFadden is out two weeks with a fractured orbital bone in his eye. The ailment won’t endanger his status for Week 1, but it is a reminder of McFadden’s frequent injury history. Barring a setback, I still see him as a middle- to late first-round choice. After all, he has an intimate knowledge of coach Hue Jackson’s system and has major statistical potential as the team’s offensive centerpiece. If you do land Run DMC, though, it’s a good idea to grab Michael Bush in the middle to late rounds as insurance.

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A sleeper,Tebow looks?

27 Jul

This is NFL news
Let the Tebow madness begin: The Denver Post is reporting that the Broncos have put Kyle Orton on the trade block, in part to open the door for Tim Tebow to be their starting quarterback in 2011. If that’s the case, then the Florida product’s fantasy appeal is going to rise … and fast. In his three starts at the end of last season, Tebow scored more fantasy points than any player in the entire league. What makes him so valuable is his skills as a runner. In those three late-season starts, Tebow rushed for a combined 199 yards and three touchdowns. If you project his yardage totals over a full season, he would have recorded 1,061 yards on the ground. That’s not to say that you should draft Tebow as your No. 1 fantasy quarterback, but grabbing him in the middle to late rounds as a No. 2 and potential sleeper candidate could turn into a very beneficial move.
Watch out for Mario Manningham: Last season, Manningham quietly finished in the top 20 in fantasy points among wide receivers on NFL.com. A big part of that success came in the absence of Steve Smith, who missed a total of seven games with an injured knee that ultimately required a microfracture procedure. Smith, a free agent, continues to recover from the operation and could start the 2011 campaign on the PUP (Physically Unable to Perform) list. According to the New York Daily News, Smith could be forced to sign a one-year deal with the G-Men (or elsewhere) due to his questionable status. Regardless, Manningham is in a position to see plenty of targets in the Giants offense and warrants middle-round attention. He could be a nice draft value.
Will Marques Colston hold out?: In a recent column in the New Orleans Times-Picayune, beat writer Jeff Duncan suggests wide receiver Marques Colston could hold out of training camp. The veteran wideout is in the final year of his contract, but he’s also coming off multiple knee surgeries — including a microfracture procedure. So while being in a contract year would make Colston more attractive (barring a holdout), the fact that he’s gone under the knife so often is a cause for concern. In fact, a worst-case scenario could turn Colston into a bust and make Robert Meachem a potential sleeper. Overall, I’d avoid picking Colston as more than a No. 2 fantasy option in drafts.

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Rice could return to stardom

24 Jul

Ray Rice on the rise in 2011: In 2009, Rice emerged into one of the most valuable running backs in fantasy football. He finished fourth in points (246.10) at his position and led countless owners to a championship. He saw his fantasy value drop a bit last season, however, scoring 32.5 fewer points while also being far less reliable — in fact, almost 30 percent of all his fantasy points came in just two games. But with the expected release of Willis McGahee, Rice’s stock could be back on the rise. The Baltimore Sun reports the team needs to save cap space, and cutting ties with McGahee is one way to help that cause. That means more work for Rice, especially near the goal line, and more value as a first-round option. If McGahee is released and the Raven’s don’t add another back, Jalen Parmele would be the front runner to become Rice’s main handcuff.
Hasselbeck could be a Titan: One of the more prominent free-agent quarterbacks on the market this summer is Matt Hasselbeck, and where he lands will help determine the value of several players. The most popular choice for his next destination might be Tennessee, where the Titans could use a veteran signal-caller to start and mentor rookie Jake Locker. In fact, Jim Wyatt of the Nashville Tennessean seems convinced that Hasselbeck will be wearing a Titans uniform in 2011. Wyatt also suggests that if Hasselbeck doesn’t land with the team, Donovan McNabb would be another option. Either way, fantasy owners should welcome the addition of either of these quarterbacks — someone has to throw the ball to troublesome (but talented) receiver Kenny Britt and super sleeper Jared Cook. It would also be nice to have some semblance of a pass attack to keep defenses from stacking the box to stop Chris Johnson. Let’s just hope CJ2K’s expected holdout doesn’t last too long…
Will Sidney Rice be a bust?: Clearly, Rice will be one of the most coveted wide receivers on the free-agent market once player movement is allowed. But is he a lock to make a major impact, both on the field and in fantasy land? Remember, Rice has had knee issues in the past and also missed most of the 2010 campaign while recovering from hip surgery. While he will be back at 100 percent this season and possesses a ton of upside, Rice has only had one truly productive season at the NFL level — that came in 2009 with Brett Favre under center. In 20 career games in which Favre wasn’t with the Vikings or didn’t play the majority of the team’s snaps, Rice has averaged 2.9 receptions for 37 yards. Those are ugly numbers. So if Rice stays with the Vikings and has Christian Ponder throwing him the football, he becomes an instant bust candidate. But if he winds up with the Bears and is catching passes from Jay Cutler, for example, Rice will be a much more attractive choice.

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Fitzgerald’s stock rising?

22 Jul

Cards looking at Kolb: With the NFL lockout apparently close to an end, rumors about player movement are picking up. One of the biggest involves a deal that would send QB Kevin Kolb to the Cardinals in exchange for CB Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, according to a report XTRA 910 Phoenix. The move would clearly make Kolb more draftable in fantasy land, albeit as a No. 2 quarterback and potential matchup-based starter. But the big winner in the deal would be Larry Fitzgerald. The stud wideout posted nice reception and yardage totals last season despite playing with less-than-desirable quarterbacks, but had just six touchdowns. With a young, talented signal-caller like Kolb, Fitzgerald would once again be a top-five wideout in drafts.

Stewart wants Williams back: During a recent interview with the Charlotte Observer, Jonathan Stewart stated his desire to have DeAngelo Williams back with the Panthers. Of course, fantasy owners would disagree with that opinion. Stewart would be worth as much as a second-round selection if he landed the top spot on the depth chart under new coach Ron Rivera. But if Williams remains with the team and a committee situation continued, Stewart’s value would take a hit. Clearly, this is one of the numerous situations that owners must monitor in the weeks to come.

Rice unlikely to re-sign with Vikes?: During his appearance on “NFL Total Access,” Sports Illustrated’s Peter King said he’d be “surprised” if the Vikings re-signed Sidney Rice. One of the better wideouts on the free-agent market, Rice is likely to gain interest from a number of teams. And with the prospect of rookie Christian Ponder opening the season as the Vikings’ No. 1 quarterback, shedding the purple and yellow could be a positive move from a fantasy perspective. If Rice lands with the Bears, for example, he would almost certainly become the top option for Jay Cutler. That’s clearly a more attractive scenario than being on the receiving end of Ponder’s passes during what would be a transition year for the Vikings. Stay tuned.

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Playoffs

19 Jul
Playoffs

Playoffs

Exhibition season History

19 Jul

Exhibition games have been played in Professional Football since the 1920s. In the early years of the sport, teams often “barnstormed”, and played squads from leagues outside their own, or against local college teams or other amateur groups, charging fans whatever the traffic would bear. These games might be played before, during or after the teams’ regular seasons. The quality of the sport during this period was such that there was not much to be seen different in an exhibition game or a regularly-scheduled game. But the players were just as competitive, and the fans demanded their money’s worth. The only restriction was a major one: all games played against league opponents were considered regular season games, meaning only games played against teams from outside the league could be considered true exhibitions (the Staley Swindle of 1921 was one notable implementation of this rule, which ended up impacting who won the championship that year). This rule was changed in 1924, which set a firm date for the end of the season and declared any games after that point to be exhibition games.

By the 1960s, teams in both the NFL and the American Football League began playing exhibition games toward the end of training camp and before the regular season, to acclimate players to game conditions. These games were priced well below the cost for regular-season games, and in some cases were “intrasquad” games, in which both offense and defense were made up of home-team players. Team owners realized modest profits from these games, because the players were still being paid only training camp per diem, so any game proceeds went strictly to management.

With the AFL-NFL merger of 1970, Professional Football was granted a Sherman Anti-Trust Act exemption, which emboldened some team owners to expand the exhibition schedule and to require season-ticket holders to pay for one, then two, then three home exhibition games if they wanted to keep their season tickets. The exhibition season then became, and remains, a large source of owner revenue that is not shared with the players. For several years through 1977, the NFL season consisted of 14 regular season games and six exhibition games, usually three at home and three away, with some played at neutral sites. Starting in 1978, the regular season was expanded to 16 games, and the exhibition season was cut from six to four games.

From 1999 to 2001, when the league consisted of an uneven 31 teams, some additional exhibition games (usually 2 or 3) were played over Hall of Fame weekend. In order to account for the uneven number of teams, each team was required to have a bye week during the exhibition season. Most teams held their bye week in Hall of Fame weekend, while the others utilized them somewhere else during the exhibition season. This practice was abandoned after the Houston Texans were added to the league in 2002, giving it an even 32 teams.

The exhibition games do not count toward any statistics, streaks, season standings or records whatsoever. For instance, the four wins incurred by the 2008 Detroit Lions in the exhibition season did not count “against them” when they went on to become the first team to lose all of their regular-season games since 1976, and the 1972 Dolphins, despite losing three exhibition games, are still considered to have played a perfect season. Similarly, Ola Kimrin’s 65-yard field goal in an exhibition game is not considered the league record, despite being longer than the 63 yard mark set by Tom Dempsey and later by Jason Elam in the regular season.

Still, Professional Football is popular enough that many fans still pay full price for exhibition game tickets, which they must purchase in order to keep their regular-season seats. Many teams are sold out on a season ticket basis and have large waiting lists, with fans required to pay a one-time or annual fee for the privilege of remaining on the waiting list. A minority of teams offer promotions and discounts to fill the stands for exhibition games; an example of this is the Buffalo Bills’ annual “Kids Day” promotion, where tickets, already the lowest priced in the league, are slashed to bargain-basement prices (around $10) for children under 12.

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